Army and Air Force Base Exchanges

Part: 
Four
Chapter: 
8

The individual exchange managers, in coordination with the base commander, make the decision as to which magazines are sold in the Army and Air Force base exchanges.[2225] These managers are instructed in the Army and Air Force Exchange Service Manual to tailor the magazine assortment at the exchange to the demand of customers in the local military community.[2226]

Regulations require magazines which have been classified by the Army and Air Force as "adult-oriented"[2227] to be displayed in a specified manner.[2228]

Once the magazine has been classified as adult-oriented it must be put on the top shelf of the self-service magazine display racks in the exchanges.[2229] The magazine front must be completely covered so that only the title is visible to the public.[2230]

In the case of video cassette films, it is the policy of these military exchanges to offer "G," "PG," "PG-13" and "R" rated videotapes for sale or rent.[2231] No "X" rated videos should be available at the exchanges.[2232] The exchanges feel they can draw this line based on a widely accepted MPAA rating system.[2233]

Notes

  1. Army and Air Force Exchange Service Manual, (Jan.. 1985), pp. 40-11, Ch. 10, Sec. 2.
  2. Id.
  3. The "adult-oriented" classification is determined as follows:
  4. Army installations: The installation commander should use the consumer advisory council to decide which magazines stocked by the exchange should be classified as adult-oriented for display purposes. The council will meet, when necessary, to review new magazines offered for sale, and to review the entire assortment every 2 years ....

    Air Force installations: The exchange manager, in coordination with the installation commander, should decide which magazines stocked by the exchange should be classified as adult-oriented ....

    On both Army and Air Force installation, departmental policies define magazines to be classified as adult-oriented as those that: (1) When considered as a whole, are patently offensive under contemporary standards of the local military community as to what is suitable material for children, and (2) If openly displayed or with portions of their contents exposed to unconsenting customers or other patrons, would invade those persons' right to privacy. Id., Sec. 3(a)-(c).

  5. Id., Sec. 3-4.
  6. Id., Sec. 4.
  7. Id.
  8. Interview with Phil Alsup, Washington Legal Counsel, Army and Air Force Exchange Service in Washington, D.C. (Mar. 7, 1986).
  9. Id.
  10. See, The discussion of the MPAA rating system in this Chapter for further information.