VI. Conclusion

Part: 
Four
Chapter: 
4

A local law enforcement officer told this Commission, "The industry is very difficult to investigate as a local police officer, as a business in one jurisdiction, in general, is incorporated in another jurisdiction, receives materials from another jurisdiction and is controlled by individuals in another jurisdiction. Federal law enforcement involvement is an absolute necessity to attack the real problem of organized crime influence."[1240] While no known additional organized crime families may live in a particular state, the effect of their production, distribution and sale of obscene material can be readily apparent. Another local law enforcement officer concluded, "Left unchecked, organized crime, in a traditional sense, can suck the lifeblood out of a community. Many times, their enterprises have been viewed as "service" oriented or victimless crimes. However, it tears at the moral fiber of society and through unbridled corruption, it can weaken the government."[1241]

The findings of the 1978 Federal Bureau of Investigation analysis remain essentially correct:

In conclusion, organized crime involvement in pornography ... is indeed significant, and there is an obvious national control directly, and indirectly by organized crime figures of that industry in the United States. Few pornographers can operate in the United States independently without some involvement with organized crime. Only through a well coordinated all out national effort, from the investigative and prosecutive forces can we ever hope to stem the tide of pornography. More importantly, the huge profits gathered by organized crime in this area and redirected to other lucrative forms of crime, such as narcotics and investment in legitimate business enterprises, are certainly cause for national concern, even if there is community apathy toward pornography.[1242]

Notes

 

  1. New York Hearing, Vol. I, Carl Shoffler, pp. 217-18.
  2. New York Hearing, Vol. II, William Johnson, p. 82A-10.
  3. Federal Bureau of Investigation Report Regarding the Extent of Organized Crime Involvement in Pornography. (1978).