II. Introduction

Part: 
Four
Chapter: 
4

Organized crime involvement in the pornography industry has been described by law enforcement officers and by organized crime operatives themselves. A retired veteran Federal Bureau of Investigation agent said of traditional[1126] organized crime members, "you cannot be in the field and distribute pornography without their consent . . . ."[1127] He added that the pornography trade is attractive to organized crime because "it's a fast way of making a buck."[1128] Aladena Fratianno, whose involvement in La Cosa Nostra dates back to the late 1940's has reached the same conclusion.[1129] In an interview with a Commission investigator, Fratianno described the connection as he knew it to be in the 1970's as follows:

  • Interviewer: Is it possible for any person to become a major distributor of pornography in the United States without becoming involved in organized crime?
  • Aladena: I doubt it. I doubt it.

     

  • Interviewer: Okay, why do you doubt it?
  • Aladena: Well, because there's so much involved and I don't think they would let them.

     

  • Interviewer: Okay, so if someone tried to operate without an involvement?
  • Aladena: Well, somebody would report 'em, they'd say look it, he's taking my business.

     

  • Interviewer: ... what would they do? Shut them down, or take them over?
  • Aladena: Well, they would do something. I really couldn't answer that. You know, they would do something. They might go so far as killing them, who knows.1130

     

Another individual who was the owner and operator of an "adult" bookstore and spent many years in the pornography business described his experience in dealing with organized crime:

  • Interviewer: ... If the mob says, "I do not want this, boy"?:

     

  • Subject: You don't sell it. Even if they don't even talk to you. You're not going to sell it nowhere. If you go to the store on 14th street and put it in there, they're gonna bust his ass. Or they're gonna break your legs when you start going through them. There was a man who went from New York City ... went into Atlanta. Had films to sell ... They found him at the airport, with a $5,000 Rolex watch on and about eight grand in his pocket, and four rolls of film in his hands, with his head blown up in the trunk of his car. Nobody robbed him, nobody took a dime off him. They didn't even take the film. But he was at the airport with a New York ticket shoved in his coat pocket. Don't come down from New York, selling unless you've been sent down.[1131]

     

Notes

  1. For a more complete explanation of traditional organized crime structures and influence see the textual discussion of organized crime, supra.
  2. New York Hearing, Vol. I, Homer Young, p. 40.
  3. Id., p. 41.
  4. New York Hearing, Vol. I, Aladena   interview, Interview by Senior Investigator Edward H. Chapman, Attorney General's Commission on Pornography, p. 112.
  5. Id., pp. 112-15.
  6. New York Hearing, Vol. I, "Bookstore Operator" interview, pp. 141-44; See also, New York Hearing, Vol. II, William Johnson, p. 82A-1 on "16 November 1970, Kenneth Herbert (Jap) Hann's bullet riddled body was found in the trunk of a car at Atlanta International Airport."