RECOMMENDATION 86

Part: 
Three
Chapter: 
4
State, county and municipal governments should facilitate the development of public and private resources for persons who are currently involved in the production or consumption of pornography and wish to discontinue this involvement and for those who suffer mental and physical disabilities as a result of exposure or participation in the production of pornography.

As described later in Chapters 16 and 17, victims of pornography may suffer a variety of physical and mental damages. The victimization may include coercion, intimidation, negative effects of forced consumption, physical assault and sexual harassment.

Resources currently exist for victims of sexual abuse and other crimes through victim compensation programs, mental health and medical treatment programs. However, if no crime is reported, as is often the case with pornography, the damages cannot be compensated by victims of crime funds. Furthermore, if mental health or medical staff are not aware of the special nature of pornography victimization, treatment may not be effective in rehabilitating the victim. Those currently involved in the production or forced into consumption of pornography are not aware of alternatives available to them, and they may never believe they can escape the victimization.

Resources for victims of pornography should include:

(A) emergency "safe houses" where persons needing short-term refuge from production or forced consumption of pornography, (B) financial assistance for persons damaged by pornography who do not qualify for public assistance or victims of crimes funds, (C) development of public information materials to assist persons escape victimization through awareness of alternatives, (D) provision of job training and educational opportunities to those who have been denied such opportunities because of financial losses, physical or mental damages incurred through production or forced consumption of pornography, (E) provision of specialized training for counselors and therapists to sensitize them to a special nature of pornography and related sexual victimization.

This training should include particular recognition of the correlated problems of substance abuse, and the allocation of resources to study short- and long-term effects of pornography on those who participate in its production and those who are forcibly exposed to it.