RECOMMENDATION 14

Part: 
Three
Chapter: 
2

The United States Attorneys should use the Law Enforcement Coordinating Committees to coordinate enforcement of the obscenity laws and to maintain surveillance of the nature and extent of the obscenity problem in the localities within their districts

The Law Enforcement Coordinating Committees (LECCs) developed under the direction of former Attorney General William French Smith are comprised of the United States Attorney and representatives of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies within the particular judicial district. The LECC's objective is to improve cooperation and coordination among participating agencies. In addition the LECCs develop law enforcement priorities for the district, target the most serious crime problems and provide a forum for an exchange of information and intelligence.

The United States Attorney for the Northern District of New York arranged a LECC conference on child pornography in his district.[206] The two hundred law enforcement personnel in attendance were addressed by Federal Bureau of Investigation Agents, United States Postal Inspectors, state police, and state and local prosecutors.[207] The New York conference greatly increased awareness of the child pornography problem and contributed to the almost immediate initiation of at least three child pornography prosecutions.[208]

In July 1984, the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina established an LECC subcommittee to investigate obscenity, organized crime and child abuse.[209] At that time the North Carolina obscenity law was considered one of the weakest in the United States and the state had the highest number of "adults only" pornographic outlets per capita of any state in the nation.[210] The North Carolina LECC subcommittee was comprised of federal, state and local law enforcement officials and spent a year developing a law enforcement blueprint.[211] The subcommittee discovered involvement of organized crime members and their associates in the obscenity business in North Carolina.[212] As a result of its investigation the LECC subcommittee drafted and recommended a more effective state obscenity law which was subsequently enacted by the North Carolina legislature.[213] They also recommended continued cooperation between federal and state authorities, and the creation of a statewide "pornography task force."[214] As a result of these efforts by the LECC subcommittee, the distribution of obscenity in North Carolina can now be more effectively controlled.[215] These two examples illustrate the effectiveness of the LECCs when utilized by United States Attorneys who are committed to fighting obscenity and its related organized crime elements.

The Department of justice guidelines allow United States Attorneys to prioritize obscenity cases where a particular problem has been identified in the district. The LECCs are a means for the United States Attorney to maintain surveillance of the nature and extent of obscenity trafficking in his or her particular jurisdiction and they should be used specifically for that purpose.

Notes

  1. Chicago Hearing, Vol. II, Frederick J. Scullin, p. 39.
  2. Id.
  3. Id., pp. 39-40.
  4. New York Hearing, Vol. II, Robert Showers, p. 60.
  5. Id., p. 59.
  6. New York Hearing, Vol. It, Sam Currin, p. 90.
  7. New York Hearing, Vol. II, Robert Showers, p. 61.
  8. Id.,p. 63.
  9. Id., p. 65; New York Hearing, Vol. 11, Sam Currin, p. 90.
  10. New York Hearing, Vol. II, Robert Showers, p. 64.